Energetics of Ginger:

Energetics of Kohlrabi: Discover Your New Favorite Vegetable

photo credit: postbear via photopin cc

photo credit: postbear via photopin cc

Kohlrabi is more than a funny name, it is also very good for you. It’s name comes from the German word kohl, cabbage, and rabi, turnip. Hence its nicknames German Cabbage and turnip cabbage. Its origin in nature is the same as that of cabbage, broccoli, cauliflower, kale, collard greens, and Brussels sprouts: they are all bred from, and are the same species as the wild cabbage plant (Brassica oleracea).

The Best Way to Choose and Store

The taste and texture of kohlrabi are similar to those of a broccoli stem or cabbage heart, but milder and sweeter. Young stems in particular can be as crisp and juicy as an apple, although not as sweet. Kohlrabi is grown annually. They weigh about 150 g and have good standing ability for up to 30 days after maturity. There are several varieties commonly available, including White Vienna, Purple Vienna, Grand Duke, Gigante (also known as “Superschmelz”), Purple Danube, and White Danube. Coloration of the purple types is superficial: the edible parts are all pale yellow. The leafy greens can also be eaten. Kohlrabi stems are surrounded by two distinct fibrous layers that do not soften appreciably when cooked. These layers are peeled away prior to cooking or serving raw. This results in stems that often provide a smaller amount of food than you assume from their intact appearance. Kohlrabi root is generally served raw in salads, while the leaves are a bit more versatile. The leaves can also be eaten raw, or they can be cooked and used like collard greens or kale.

Energetics

Kohlrabi nutritionKohlrabi is rich in vitamins and dietary fiber while only containing on 27 calories per 100g. Kohlrabi is especially high in vitamin C, with 102% of your recommended daily value. It also contains health-promoting phytochemicals such as isothiocyanates, sulforaphane, and indole-3-carbinol that are supposed to protect against prostate and colon cancers. Kohlrabi has high levels of minerals throughout the plant. The stem also has an abundance of copper, calcium, potassium, manganese, iron, and phosphorus. The leaves are also very nutritious, with high levels of carotenes, vitamin A, vitamin K, minerals, and B-complex group of vitamins.

Kohlrabi improves qi energy circulation, eliminates blood coagulation and stagnancy, reduces damp conditions in the body, relieves painful or difficult urination, stops bleeding in the colon, reduces swelling of the scrotum, and alleviates the effects of intoxication by drugs or alcohol. It is used in the treatment of indigestion and blood sugar imbalance, especially in people with hypoglycemia and diabetes. The juice is drunk as a remedy for nose bleeds.

Roasted Kohlrabi and Butternut Squash

Roasted Kohlrabi and Butternut Squash

Servings: 4

Ingredients

  • 4 medium kohlrabi (2 1/4 lb with greens or 1 3/4 lb without)
  • 2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
  • 2 teaspoons finely chopped fresh thyme
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon black pepper
  • 2 1/2 lb butternut squash

 

Preparation

Put oven rack just below middle position and put baking pan on rack, then preheat oven to 450°F. (If roasting vegetables along with turkey, preheat pan for 15 minutes while turkey roasts, then roast vegetables underneath turkey.)

Trim and peel kohlrabi, then cut into 3/4-inch pieces. Toss kohlrabi with 1 tablespoon oil, 1 teaspoon thyme, 1/4 teaspoon salt, and 3/4 teaspoon pepper in a bowl. Transfer kohlrabi to preheated pan in oven and roast 15 minutes.

Meanwhile, peel butternut squash, then quarter lengthwise, seed, and cut into 3/4-inch pieces. Toss squash with remaining 1 tablespoon oil, 1 teaspoon thyme, 1/4 teaspoon salt, and 3/4 teaspoon pepper in same bowl.

Stir kohlrabi, turning it, then push it to one side of pan.

Add squash to opposite side of pan and roast, stirring and turning squash over halfway through roasting, until vegetables are tender and lightly browned, about 30 minutes total (after squash is added).

Toss vegetables to combine and transfer to a dish.

 

Source

Roasted Kohlrabi and Butternut Squash

Energetics of Flaxseeds: More Than A Seed

Did you know that Charlemagne himself was a huge fan of flaxseeds?  He was so impressed with the versatility of the flaxseed (it can be used as food, medicine, and as a source of fiber in linen) that he created and passed laws that required its cultivation and consumption.

The earliest farming and consumption of flaxseed happened in Mesopotamia around the Stone Age. There are even records of it being used in Ancient Greece. The botanical name for flax is linum usitatissimum, which means most useful.  A most apt name for this multitasking seed.

Varieties

There are 2 main varieties of flaxseeds.  Flaxseeds are a bit larger than sesame seeds and they have a hard outer shell. Flaxseeds can be purchased as whole seeds, ground into a meal, or as oil. Flaxseeds are available all year round.

Yellow and Golden flaxseeds are used mostly for culinary uses.  When buying flaxseed at the store, this is the variety available.

Brown flaxseed is used mostly in the production of paint (as an oil additive) and linen.  It is also used as cattle feed.

How to Choose and Store

Flaxseeds are usually stored in either bulk bins or are prepackaged. If you platoon buying bulk always make sure that the store has a quick turnover of inventory and that the bins have a good seal. Always check to make sure there is no moisture gathering as that can lead to rotting and mold.

To extend the shelf life of your flaxseed I suggest buying it whole.  Whole flaxseed stay fresher longer than pre-ground seeds. Whole flaxseed needs to be stored in an airtight container and put in a cool, dark, dry place (like the fridge). If stored properly flaxseeds will stay fresh up to 3 months.  If you wish to extend the life, you can store them in the freezer for up to 6 months.

If you are buying flaxseed oil make sure you get cold-pressed or organic.  It should be stored in an opaque bottle and stored in the fridge.

How to Properly Use Flaxseeds

Always grind flaxseeds before serving.  In order to allow the digestion and absorption of nutrients from flaxseeds, they need to be ground to break their hard shells. You can find flax seeds pre-ground or you can buy whole seeds (which have a longer shelf life) and use a coffee grinder at home.

Nutrition

Flaxseeds are a great source of alpha-linolenic acid (ALA), an omega-3 fatty acid. ALA is an easy to use form of energy for the body, it inhibits inflammatory compounds,  and is also essential for proper skin function. Diets rich in ALA are associated with a lower risk of atherosclerosis and heart disease. Flaxseeds are also a great source of lignan phytoestrogens, this is a phytonutrient that is converted into 2 hormone-like substances, enterolactone and enterodiol.  These hormone-like substances demonstrate a number of protective functions against breast cancer.  Flaxseeds are a good source of dietary fiber, containing both insoluble and soluble fiber. Therefore, they have been found to have a laxative effect decreasing constipation and increasing the number of bowel movements. Flaxseeds are also a good source of free-radical-scavenging manganese and copper, as well as bone-building phosphorus.

Energetics

Flaxseeds are neutral, so they are neither warming or cooling, and they have a sweet flavor.  Flaxseeds can be used as a laxative or to relieve pain and inflammation.  They influence the spleen-pancreas and colon. As a rich source of omega-3 fatty acids, flaxseeds are great for boosting immunity and cleaning the heart and arteries of plaque.

Blueberry Lemon Breakfast Quinoa

Ingredients:

Directions:

  1. Rinse quinoa in a fine strainer with cold water to remove bitterness until water runs clear and is no longer frothy.
  2. Heat milk in a saucepan over medium heat until warm, 2 to 3 minutes. Stir quinoa and salt into the milk; simmer over medium-low heat until much of the liquid has been absorbed, about 20 minutes. Remove saucepan from heat. Stir maple syrup and lemon zest into the quinoa mixture. Gently fold blueberries into the mixture.
  3. Divide quinoa mixture between 2 bowls; top each with 1 teaspoon ground flax seeds to serve.

Source

 

Coping with Seasonal Stress

The holiday season can be filled with a dizzying array of demands, visitors, travel and frantic shopping trips. For many people, it is also a time filled with sadness, self-reflection, loneliness and anxiety. Compound the usual seasonal pressures with economic strain and you many find this to be one of the most emotionally trying times of the year.

Boost your overall ability to handle seasonal stress by replenishing the nutrients that stress hormones deplete by including the following foods in your meals:

Blackberries – Blackberries are jam packed with vitamin C, calcium and magnesium. Vitamin C has shown to be a powerful stress reducer that can lower blood pressure and return cortisol levels to normal faster when taken during periods of stress.

Cruciferous Vegetables – Cauliflower, broccoli, cabbage, and kale are full of stress-relieving B vitamins. Cauliflower is also one of the very best sources of vitamin B5, or pantothenic acid. Pantothenic acid helps turn carbohydrates and fats into usable energy and improves your ability to respond to stress by supporting your adrenal glands.

Salmon – Salmon is a healthy and delicious way to get your dose of B vitamins and omega-3 fatty acids. Among the many benefits of omega-3 fatty acids, a 2003 study published in Diabetes & Metabolism found that a diet rich in omega-3 fatty acids significantly reduced the stress response and kept the stress hormones cortisol and epinephrine in check.

 

© Donna Sigmond, EastWest Wellness

Energetics of Jackfruit: Jack of All Trades

Native to South India, this fruit is very popular in tropical regions and is even the national fruit of Bangladesh. Jackfruit is in the Moraceae family, which includes the fig, mulberry and breadfruit. It is the largest tree-born fruit, easily getting up to 80 lbs.

Jackfruit is known for having a strong aroma to it, the aroma is a sweet combination of banana and pineapple. The taste is similar to its aroma.  Everyone who tries it has a different impression but the most common flavor profiles people taste are combinations of apple, pineapple, mango, or banana.  I personally think it tastes like a strawberry banana smoothie.   The seeds are also special, in that they apparently smell like chocolate after they are roasted.

Varieties

These are distinguished by the characteristics of the jackfruit flesh.  Both the jackfruit’s flesh and seeds are consumed.

Varikka/Kaapa/Jaca-dura: The inner flesh is hard when ripe and tends to be drier and less sweet.

Koozha/Barka/Jaca-mole: The inner flesh is very soft when ripe and almost dissolves when you eat it due to its moistness.  This variety is very sweet and tends to have a darker gold colored flesh.

Imba: This type is ground up and spread over a mat to dry in the sun to make a natural chewy candy.

Ripe jackfruit is naturally sweet with subtle flavors and is used in many dishes, mostly dessert or sweet dishes.   The seeds of the ripe jackfruit are edible and have a milky, sweet taste.  They can be boiled, baked, or roasted.  The roasted and dried seeds are often used in curries.

Unripe or young jackfruit is extremely popular in South and Southeast Asia.  It is used in many cuisines, including curries and as filling for cutlets and chops. Young jackfruit is very sought after by vegetarians and vegans for its ability to be a meat substitute. In order to eat unripe jackfruit you must first peel it and then the remaining fruit can be chopped into edible portions. It has a mild taste and has a distinct meat-like texture (think shredded chicken).

How to Choose and Store

Jackfruit comes as a whole fruit, which is very large with spiky skin, or it comes pre-cut up and packaged for your convenience.

Ripe: When shopping for whole ripe Jackfruit look for ones that give off a strong sweet smell, which starts happening a few days bore it is fully ripe.  For pre-packaged ripe jackfruit, make sure that the pieces are not discolored, they should be vibrant yellow, and they should be soft and tender.

Unripe: When shopping for whole unripe jackfruit, look for ones that do not have a strong smell.  Pre-packaged fresh unripe jackfruit are harder to come by, as most stores only sell ripe jackfruit fresh, but you can find canned unripe jackfruit in the canned foods aisle of your grocery store.  When buying canned jackfruit, always buy jackfruit that is in water or brine, never in syrup.

Cut up jackfruit can be stored in the fridge for up to 7 days and the freezer up to 2 months. Although, for the best flavor eat jackfruit as fresh as possible.

Pro-Tip: Jackfruit are very sticky, so when cutting into the fruit it is best to coat your knife in oil first.

Nutrition

Jackfruit is surprisingly low calorie for a fruit, at only 95 calories per 100g. It is also rich in dietary fiber and vitamin C.  Jackfruit is a great source of the B vitamins pyridoxine (B6), niacin (B3), riboflavin (B2), and folic acid (B9). It is also a small but significant source of vitamin A and the flavonoids carotene-B, xanthin, lupine, and cryptoxanthin-B. Jackfruit is a good source of potassium, magnesium, manganese, and iron.

Energetics

Jackfruit is both sweet and sour, as well as cooling.

Jackfruit is considered empty sweet and is therefore heavily cleansing and cooling. Jackfruit can help build the yin-fluids, such as tissue and bodily fluids, and help tonify a thin and dry person.  Jackfruit helps moisten dry conditions in the lungs.

Unripe jackfruit tends to be more sour than sweet. It has an astringent effect which can help prevent or reverse abnormal leakage of fluids and energy.  It also dries and firms the body tissues.

Cautions: Those who are overweight, sluggish, or have a damp constitution should avoid overeating jackfruit.

Smoky Slow Cooker Pulled Jackfruit Chili

Ingredients:

  • 18 oz black beans drained and rinsed if from can,
  • 18 oz kidney beans drained and rinsed if from can,
  • 18 oz cannellini beans drained and rinsed if from can,
  • 1/2 red onion diced
  • 5 oz mushrooms diced
  • 2 20 oz cans of young green jackfruit in water NOT in syrup or brine!
  • 2 28 oz can of Ro*tel Original Diced Tomatoes and Green Chilis drained
  • Homemade smokey chili seasoning recipe below

Homemade Chili Seasoning

  • 2 TBSP chili powder
  • 5 TBSP garlic powder
  • 5 tsp onion powder
  • 2 tsps crushed red pepper flakes less if you’d prefer no heat
  • 5 tsps dried oregano
  • 1 tsp smoked paprika
  • 1 tsp chipotle chili powder
  • 3 tsp ground cumin
  • 2 tsp kosher salt
  • 2 tsp cracked black pepper

Garnish

  • Plain Greek yogurt
  • Thinly sliced scallions
  • Grated cheddar cheese

Instructions

  1. Mix all of the contents for the homemade smokey chili seasoning together until perfectly blended. Set aside.
  2. Place all of the chili ingredients into the slow cooker.
  3. Dump the chili seasoning into the slow cooker and mix well to blend.
  4. Keep the slow cooker on high for 3-4 hours or on low for 6-8 hours.
  5. Serve and garnish with optional garnishes.

Source

 

Really? BPA free? Toxicity and Plastics

Really? BPA free?  Toxicity and Plastics

Plastics are everywhere, convenient and affordable.    Personally, I do not find the benefits outweighing the harm that they cause.  Two known and well-researched toxic chemicals are Bisphenol A (BPA) and Phthalates.  The harm is in the toxic chemicals that plastic releases into the environment and into our bodies.  Odorless and tasteless, yet daily exposure to these harmful chemicals changes our DNA.  Children are at the greatest risk since they consume more for their size. 1,2,3   We often see sports fields littered with drink bottles cooking in the hot sun.  Our kids then consume those toxins leached from the heated plastic.

Bisphenol A (BPA) is a compound found in plastics.  BPA’s are an endocrine disruptor (think messes with your hormones) and many manufacturers are advertising BPA free products.  Unfortunately, BPA’s are still used in the lining of canned goods and containers as plastic products not used for consumables such as pacifiers and toys .  We also know it is not the only harmful compound in plastic that is toxic.

Phthalates are a well-researched but underreported chemical found in plastics.  Phthalates are endocrine disruptors and found in all plastics and many cosmetics.

Due to limited research dollars there are other compounds that haven’t been tested for their impact on our bodies and the environment.  Ignorance is not bliss as these compounds are often stored in our fat tissue and builds up in our body, soil, ocean and the air we breathe.

What can you do to minimize your exposure to these harmful chemicals?    Embrace alternatives like bamboo, glass, stainless steel (although many have a resin plastic coating inside), and all natural cloth.  Use a glass containers for leftovers, a stainless steel thermos, and organic cotton lunch bags.  Glass containers can go from the freezer to the microwave.  Some of my favorite products are:  Life Factory glass water bottles, versatile and colorful ECO Lunchbags,  and Pyrex glass container sets.  Opt never to use plastic in the microwave.

If you use plastic look at the number rating on the bottom of the container and use the following as your guide.4

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Harvard School of Public Health Study appears in the Journal of Environmental Health Perspectives, September, 2009

http://ehp03.niehs.nih.gov/article/fetchArticle.action?articleURI=info:doi/10.1289/ehp.0900604

1 http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/ajmg.b.31094/full

2 http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2920080/

3 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0160412011000432

4 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Resin_identification_code

 

© Donna Sigmond, EastWest Wellness

Acupuncture for Post Operative Pain and Fibromyalgia

Research from Duke University Medical Center has shown that acupuncture can significantly reduce surgical patients’ post-operative pain, and their need for powerful opioids to treat pain.

Duke University anesthesiologists combined data from 15 randomized clinical trials to reach their conclusion. Using acupuncture both before and after surgery produced the best results for patients, who reported lower levels of post-operative pain and a significantly reduced need for painkillers. In addition, acupuncture mitigated the negative side effects of opioids when they were used.

“The most important outcome for the patient is the reduction of the side effects associated with opioids,” said T.J. Gan, M.D., the Duke anesthesiologist who presented the study at the annual scientific conference of the American Society for Anesthesiology in San Francisco in October 2007. Gan pointed out that acupuncture is a relatively inexpensive therapy that has virtually no side effects when practiced by trained professionals.

Many other studies have shown acupuncture effective in reducing post-operative nausea and vomiting compared with other medications.

According to a meta-analysis presented at the American Society of Anesthesiologists’ meeting, acupuncture reduced rates of post-operative nausea by 32 percent, pruritus (itchiness at the surgical site) by 25 percent, dizziness by 38 percent, and urinary retention by 71 percent compared with control groups.

Acupuncture is excellent for managing post-surgical side effects such as surgical pain, loss of appetite, and upset stomach or nausea. In addition to strengthening the immune system and increasing energy, acupuncture is also a great way to reduce swelling, decrease stiffness and pain, reduce scarring and scar tissue and assist with a quick recovery.

If you, or a loved one, will be undergoing surgery, please call us to see if acupuncture can improve your recovery.

Acupuncture for Fibromyalgia Syndrome

Fibromyalgia Syndrome (FMS) affects an estimated two percent of the population. It is diagnosed when there is a history of widespread pain in all four quadrants of the body for a minimum duration of three months and pain when pressure is applied to at least 11 of 18 designated tender points on the body.Research shows that as many as 90 percent of people with fibromyalgia have turned to complimentary and alternative medicine to manage their symptoms. Acupuncture, in particular, has become a popular treatment choice and has shown to be an effective treatment for FMS.

Oriental medicine does not recognize fibromyalgia as one particular disease pattern. Instead, it aims to treat the specific symptoms that are unique to each individual depending on their constitution, emotional state, the intensity and location of their pain, digestive health, sleeping patterns and an array of other signs and symptoms.

A treatment program may include a combination of psychological or behavioral therapies, medications, exercise, acupuncture, herbal medicine and bodywork.

If you have fibromyalgia call today to see how acupuncture can ease your symptoms!

 

© Donna Sigmond, EastWest Wellness

Revitalize Your Digestive Health With Acupuncture

 

More than 95 million Americans suffer from digestive disorders ranging from constipation, diarrhea and irritable bowel syndrome to more serious conditions such as acid reflux (GERD), ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s disease. In fact, more than 35 million physician office visits a year are due to gastrointestinal complaints. Reports are confirming that acupuncture and Oriental medicine can offer relief from even the most complex digestive problems.

Diagnosis and Treatment of Digestive Disorders

Evidence that Oriental medicine has been used for digestive disorders can be found in early medical literature dating back to 3 AD, where specific acupuncture points and herbal formulas for borborygmus (rumbling or gurgling in the intestines), abdominal pain and diarrhea with pain are discussed.

According to Oriental medical theory, most digestive disorders are due to disharmony in the spleen and stomach. The spleen plays a central part in the health and vitality of the body, taking a lead role in the assimilation of nutrients and maintenance of physical strength. It turns digested food from the stomach into usable nutrients and qi (energy). Many schools of thought have been formed around this organ; the premise being that the proper functioning of the”‘middle” is the key to all aspects of vitality.

By taking into account a person’s constitution and varied symptoms, a treatment plan is designed specifically for the individual to bring their “middle” back into harmony and optimize the proper functioning of the digestive system. A variety of techniques can be used during treatment including acupuncture, lifestyle/dietary recommendations and energetic exercises to restore digestive health.

Is your digestive system functioning as well as it could? Acupuncture and Oriental medicine are extremely effective at treating a wide array of digestive disorders. Please call us for more information or to schedule an appointment.

© Donna Sigmond, EastWest Wellness

Enegetics of Cabbage: Harmonious Health Benefits

Isn’t cabbage cute? photo credit: welovepandas via photopin cc

Every St. Patrick’s Day, many people make corned beef and cabbage without realizing the incredible health benefits of this cruciferous vegetable. It is a rich source of vitamin C (having more vitamin C than oranges), and its outer leaves have high concentrations of vitamin E. Cabbage is unique for its rich supply of glucosinolates, which have special detox and anti-cancer properties. Glucosinolates are also found in turnips, watercress, and radishes.

A note on color variations: Diversification of color options is ideal, as red and green cabbage provide different benefits that complement one another.

Cabbage lasts about a week in the refrigerator, and the healthiest way to cook it is to sauté it in water or broth, which will minimize leaching of nutrients. It may be eaten raw (see recipe below) or steamed. However, we strongly warn against boiling, as it will minimize cabbage’s nutritional value.

Click here for nutrition facts, courtesy of The World’s Healthiest Foods.

Energetics: Lowers cholesterol (especially when steamed),; helps prevent cancer; reduces inflammation; supports cardiovascular health; improves digestion; treats constipation, the common cold, and whooping cough; helps rid the digestive system of worms; remedies ulcers; and cleanses and rejuvenates the digestive tract (as sauerkraut).

Crunchy Chinese Coleslaw

Yummy!

This recipe was taught long ago to us by a friend. It is delicious and nutritious. We couldn’t get enough! This is an easy recipe for any get-together and is a great way to incorporate raw cabbage into your diet.

4 c. green cabbage, finely chopped
3 green onions, chopped
2 tbsp. sesame seeds
2 tbsp. slivered almonds
1/2 pkg. ramen noodles, raw and crushed

(Note: We highly recommend buying organic ingredients, especially ramen noodles. Do NOT use ramen packages available in conventional groceries stores, as they are loaded with potentially-harmful additives. You can find higher quality ramen in Asian markets or health food stores.)

Brown sesame seed, almonds and noodles in cooking oil of your choice or toast in the oven. Each item must be done separately due to fact they all have different browning temperature. Mix above ingredients together, and dress with the following dressing.

Dressing:

3/4 c. sesame oil
1/2 c. cooking oil of your choice
1/4 c. turbinado (or raw) sugar (or your favorite sweetener, to taste)
1/4 c. soy sauce
5 tbsp. rice vinegar
1 tbsp. black pepper

Mix soy sauce, vinegar, and sugar together in small saucepan. Whisk in 1/2 cup oil and boil 1 minute, whisking all of the time (mixture will foam). Remove from heat and whisk in sesame oil. Cool and pour over above ingredients. Chill until serving time. Depending on the size of the head of cabbage this recipe will fill a large 2 to 4 quart bowl.

Resources
“Cabbage,” The World’s Healthiest Foods. http://whfoods.org/genpage.php?tname=foodspice&dbid=19
“What Are the Health Benefits of Red Cabbage vs. Green Cabbage?”Livestrong. http://www.livestrong.com/article/410758-what-are-the-health-benefits-of-red-cabbage-vs-green-cabbage/
“Glucosinolates (Goitrogenic Glycosides),” Cornell University Department of Animal Science. http://www.ansci.cornell.edu/plants/toxicagents/glucosin.html

Energetics of Cherry: The Tart/Sweet Superfood

Inflammation and pain are a few of the most common symptoms that people experience. You can easily see this by looking at any over-the-counter medicine aisle at your local grocery store. Lucky for us, cherries are a wonderful and natural remedy for lowering pain and inflammation—among many other benefits! Vote with your dollar and support farms that produce foods that positively impact our health in the most beneficial ways possible. Two DELICIOUS cherry recipes are at the end of this blog.

Energetics

Warming thermal nature; sweet flavor; increases and assists in the circulation of qi energy, tonifies the spleen-pancreas, clears and cleanses blood, and prevents involuntary seminal emission. Tart cherries are astringent and help to tighten and move out excess leaking conditions like excess sweating and frequent urination. Remedy for exhaustion, fatigue, diabetes, gout, arthritis, and rheumatism by eliminating excess body acids.  Treats coldness, improves blood and anemia.

 

Nutrition

Essentially, cherries come in two versions: sweet (which most people are accustomed to, and prefer most often) and tart. Generally, both have the benefits listed within this blog, however tart cherries are the ones that pack the most powerful superfood punch! The flavonoids contained in both types are praised for their anticancer effects and antioxidant capacities. Antioxidants are heavily important to ingest in one’s diet because they have the ability to minimize free-radical activity within the body; free radicals are oxidized molecules that cause damage at the cellular level.

Sweet Cherries

Did you know that cherries can help you sleep better, speed up exercise recovery, and relieve aches & pains?  Tart cherries, or tart cherry juice, is an easily absorbed source of natural melatonin – one of the few natural sources available. While you’re sleeping better, the anthocyanin’s antioxidants (like lutein and zeaxanthin), combined with beta carotene, vitamin C, and quercetin (a blood vessel relaxer) are burning fat more efficiently and reducing uric acid and inflammation.  Inflammation conditions like fibromyalgia, arthritis, and gout, and even sore muscles can be reduced with a cup or two of daily cherries.

Cherries also contain potassium (1 cup of cherries is equal in potassium to a small banana) which helps lowers blood pressure. The darker the cherry the higher the anthocyanin content.  These same nutrients help fight cancer, lower inflammation, enhances the production of cytokines (thus regulating immune responses), and also keeps the brain healthy too.

Sweet and Tart Cherries, fresh & raw

Nutritive Value per 100g

Principle

Nutrient Value per 100g

Percentage of RDA

Cherry type

 Sweet

    Tart

 Sweet

   Tart

Energy

 63 cal      50 Kcal

  3%        2.5%

Carbohydrates

16.1 g      12.18 g

12%        9%

Protein

1.06 g      1.00 g

2%         2%

Total Fat

  0.2 g         0.3 g

1%       1.5%

Cholesterol

    0 g           0 g

0%         0%

Dietary Fiber

 2.1 g         1.6 g

5.5%       4%

Vitamins

Folates

4 mcg           8 mcg

1%            2%

Niacin

0.154 mg   0.400 mg

 1%         2.5%

Pantothenic acid

0.199 mg    0.143 mg

4%             3%

Pyridoxine

0.049 mg   0.044 mg

4%          3.5%

Riboflavin

0.033 mg    0.040 mg

2.5%          3%

Thiamin

0.027 mg    0.030 mg

2%          2.5%

Vitamin C

     7 mg        10 mg

11%        17%

Vitamin A

     640IU      1283 IU

21%        43%

Vitamin E

 0.07 mg     0.07 mg

0.5%         0.5%

Vitamin K

  2.1 mcg     2.1 mcg

2%            2%

Electrolytes

Sodium

     0 mg           3mg

0%             0%

Potassium

  222 mg       179mg

5%             4%

Minerals

Calcium

   13 mg         16 mg

1.3%       1.6%

Copper

0.060 mg   0.104 mg

7%        11.5%

Iron

  0.36 mg   0.32 mg

4.5%       4%

Magnesium

    11 mg        9mg

3%          2%

Manganese

0.070 mg   0.112mg

3%            5%

Phosphorus

    21 mg     15 mg

3%           2%

Zinc

 0.07 mg     0.10 mg

0.5%        0.1%

Phyto-nutrients

Carotene, alpha

   0 mcg        0 mcg

Carotene, beta

  38 mcg   770 mcg

Crypto-xanthin, ß

    0 mcg      0 mcg

Lutein-zeaxanthin

  85 mcg    85 mcg

(Source: USDA Nutrient database)

Preparation

Cherries are in season from May to August.  Try Bing, heart-shaped Lambert, and golden Rainier sweet cherries, or Montmorency tart cherries.  Eat within a day or two of purchase, and rinse just prior to eating.  Look for shiny, deep colored cherries with a green stem still attached. If purchasing dried tart cherries, then be sure to check the ingredients panel as most contain added sugar. Whether treating yourself with wild (sweet) cherries or tart (sour) cherries, it’s a healthy indulgence, so dig in!

 

Kale Quinoa Montmorency Tart Cherry Salad w/ Salmon Recipe

Total Time: 65 Minutes

Prep: 20 Minutes

Cook: 45 Minutes
Yield: 4 People
Level: Beginner

Ingredients

  • Butternut Squash Ingredients:
  • 1 1/2 cups cubed butternut squash (1/2 inch cubes)
  • 2 teaspoons extra virgin olive oil
  • 1/2 teaspoon rubbed sage
  • Salmon Ingredients:
  • 2-7 ounce salmon filets
  • 1 teaspoon extra virgin olive oil
  • 4 lemon slices
  • Salad Dressing Ingredients:
  • 1/4 cup apple cider vinegar
  • 3 tablespoons Montmorency tart cherry concentrate
  • 2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
  • 2 tablespoons shallot, minced
  • 1 large garlic clove, minced
  • 2 teaspoons honey
  • salt and pepper to taste
  • Salad Ingredients:
  • 1 bunch curly kale, stems removed and finely chopped
  • 1 tablespoon extra virgin olive oil
  • 2 cups cooked quinoa (hot or chilled)
  • 1 cup dried Montmorency tart cherries
  • 1/2 cup toasted walnuts

Directions

Make Butternut Squash and Salmon:

Preheat oven to 375 degrees.

Toss butternut squash with olive oil, rubbed sage, and salt and pepper to taste. Spread on parchment lined baking sheet and roast for 30 minutes or until squash is tender and beginning to caramelize on edges.

Place Salmon, skin side down, in small baking dish or foil lined baking sheet. Drizzle with olive oil, sprinkle with salt and pepper, and place lemon slices on top of filets. Roast for 15 minutes or until just opaque. Allow salmon to cool slightly before removing skin. Use fork to flake fish into chunks.

Make Salad Dressing:

While butternut squash and salmon are cooking, mix salad dressing ingredients in a bowl, liquid measuring cup, or jar with lid. Whisk or shake salad dressing until well combined. Set aside.

Assemble Salad:

Place chopped kale in a large bowl. Drizzle with olive oil, a spritz of fresh lemon juice, and squeeze/massage kale leaves with clean hands for about 5 minutes or until leaves begin to tenderize and turn a dark glossy green. Toss kale with half of the salad dressing and set aside for 10 minutes.

Add quinoa, dried Montmorency Cherries, toasted walnuts, and butternut squash to the kale. Drizzle with remaining dressing and stir to combine. Gently fold in salmon and serve.

Tips:

Be sure to cut kale into small pieces and massage for at least 5 minutes to ensure tender delicious leaves.

Butternut squash and salmon can be cooked at the same time. Just add salmon to the oven halfway through the squash’s cooking time.

Butternut squash, salmon, and quinoa can be made the day before and mixed together before serving.

Salad can be tossed together with freshly cooked warm quinoa, butternut squash, and salmon for a warm salad, or assembled with precooked chilled ingredients for a cold salad.

Recipe courtesy of Emily Caruso, jellytoastblog.com

Cherry Ice (Serves 4)

Ingredients

  • 1/2 cup dry white wine
  • 1/3 cup honey
  • 2 tablespoons freshly squeezed lemon juice
  • 2 cups pitted cherries, fresh or frozen, plus whole ones for garnish

Directions

In a medium bowl, whisk together wine, honey, and lemon juice until combined. Set aside.

Place cherries in a food processor; pulse until finely chopped. Transfer to bowl with liquid mixture; stir until combined. Pour into a shallow metal pan and place in freezer. Stir with a fork every 10 minutes until mixture is slushy and partially solidified, about 35 minutes. Spoon into serving cups; garnish with whole cherries.

 

http://www.lifeextension.com/magazine/2007/12/sf_cherries/page-01

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1082894/

http://aprilcrowell.com/asian-medicine/cherries-natures-blood-cleanser